Contents

I have had the Trijicon 7MOA dot in my possession for about a week. I chose the dual illuminated version for set it and forget it use. I have not had range time with the optic yet but have had plenty of time to examine and play with it.

Trijicon RMR: initial thoughts

Trijicon RMR: initial thoughtsI have had the Trijicon 7MOA dot in my possession for about a week. I chose the dual illuminated version for set it and forget it use. I have not had range time with the optic yet but have had plenty of time to examine and play with it. So far I see it as simply an augmentation to my iron sights. It is lightweight, rugged, and wonderfully simple. Windage and elevation are 1moa audible clicks. I really appreciate the fact that I can still use my iron sights to make elevation adjustments and shoot on targets at father ranges while using the RMR. Raising the elevation wheel on the rear of my chopped A4 handle simply lifts the dot off the front post. I will be playing with this “feature” and my zero to keep it useable in such a way if possible. Again, I have not been to the range with this one yet. One thing to keep in mind is that my photographs don’t capture the dot intensity as it actually presents itself to the eye. In the photos the dot seems to have lost some impact. DITTO when the optic is in the bright sun, for in direct sunlight glows like it is radioactive. It does bloom in direct sunlight but nothing that would impair the dot’s ability to do its job. Being that it is absolute co-witness I left my large ghost ring up and thus my irons are always deployed. The RMR, like all battery free reflex dots, has limitations when it comes to backgrounds and lighting. The kung-fu is strong with the RMR: as you can see from the photo even white backgrounds don’t wash out the dot. The dot may appear less quick to the eye but the dot remains usable. However, the RMR fails the age old bane of reflex sights… interior windows to a bright sunny day.  When peering from my dark bedroom to the bright day outside the dot washes and irons must be utilized. The dot does not totally wash out, but who wants to search for the faint dot in such a situation? So far I am happy with my purchase. The RMR has value to me in that it has zero electric parts to fail and augments my iron sight setup well. Once I get a flip down rear BUIS i will be a happy camper. It is also light, something I didn’t think too much of until I mounted my 1-4x variable. I feel that it will augment my equipment for carbine competitions quite well. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

[Review] Howa 1500 Barreled Action: Easiest Bolt Build?

[Review] Howa 1500 Barreled Action: Easiest Bolt Build?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Some would tell you that a bolt gun is just a bolt gun. Lift the bolt, pull it, push it, drop it…seen one, seen them all. They are wrong . Howa 1500 in MDT and Boyds ‘ – top to bottom: MDT ESS, MDT LSS-XL Gen 2, Boyds’ Platinum, Boyds’ AT-One If you’re looking for a bolt-action rifle you’re probably looking at it for one of two reasons – either to hunt with or to reach out a long distance and touch something. It doesn’t matter if you’re at a PRS event or in the mountains of Montana, you need a bolt-rifle that works – always. From Remington in America to Tikka in Finland, no two bolt-action actions are the same. While some legendary names have fallen from grace due to their failure of quality control, other names have never gained the respect they deserve. Enter – Howa. Table of Contents Loading... Who is Howa? If you’re a history buff, you already know who Howa is. For the rest of us, here is a summary: Howa as a company is well over 100 years old, founded in Japan they have since made everything from massive industrial machining tools, to construction vehicles, to recoilless rifles, and AR-18s. For the collectors out there, Howa built Arisaka rifles are highly prized. You can find more about their history and their role in WWII arms development on their Howa Firearms History page. Basically – if it can be built, Howa can build it. Howa Golden Bear in .30-06 For the American firearms market, Howa had their big break with the Golden Bear bolt-action rifle in the late 1960s, of which the Howa 1500 is a direct descendant of. And that brings us to now… Howa 1500 Barreled Action I became interested in the Howa 1500 because of how many of them I had been seeing on Brownells . With well over a dozen versions of the barreled action being offered at great prices, I wanted to see if these lived up to their hallowed company’s name. Eager to let me find out, Legacy Sports arranged to have several models sent to me – a 6.5 Creedmoor, .30-06, .308 Win, and .300 Win Mag arrived shortly after at my FFL. I won’t bore you with those details, because the fun starts when I mounted them in MDT Chassis and Boyds’ Rifle Stocks . The Bare Action and Barrel It’s…well, it’s an action and barrel. I’ll be honest here – this part isn’t exciting. It’s also hard to really judge it since it’s kind of like looking at a meat patty outside of the bun. Sure, it’s tasty and important – but it’s missing most of what really makes it awesome. Howa BAs all come with hinged floorplates and internal magazines. They are simple, robust, and clean. Really everything that you could ask for from a magazine system. Here is where the nice features start – the bottom metal, is metal . With the huge influx of budget-minded bolt-action rifles on the market, a common trend we’re seeing is the use of plastic for the bottom “metal” of the rifle action. While plastic saves cost and a tiny amount of weight, it’s damned unhelpful for strength and mounting in an aftermarket stock. Right off the bat, Howa pleased me by having true metal in their bottom metals. Good on you, Howa Mount Up I’ll focus on the chassis and stocks used for this project in articles to come, but I want to give you a short preview first – since they go hand in hand with the Howa 1500 itself. MDT provided me with their ESS and LSS-XL Chassis to go with my Howas and I have to say – these are just mind-blowingly awesome chassis. I went into this hugely skeptical of their price tags and if they could actually deliver on them… LSS-XL Gen2 and a Caldwell bag But now after using them, my wallet cries knowing I can never go back to budget chassis. Boyds’ Stocks were another one I’ve never used before, and they were kind enough to provide me with two – their AT-One and their Platinum Stock. Both are outstanding. While the MDT chassis are built like tanks, the Boyds’ stocks are beautiful to look at, stunningly lightweight, and provide that warm natural feeling that simply cannot be replicated with anything but real wood. Nothing feels like wood, except real wood. There is a reason people keep going back to a classic. I plan on buying a couple more Boyds’ for my .270 Win Tikka and my Ruger 10/22 as Boyds’ has now become my goto for hunting stocks. Both systems were very easy to install, it was literally just removing two screws – setting the barreled action in the stock/chassis, and screwing it into the right torque level. Check out my complete review of the Modular Drive Technologies Chassis and the "Boyds’ Rifle Stocks" ! Howa bout’ Function Did you laugh at my pun? Good. Howa actions are crisp and smooth – period. I tried a few different oils and greases on mine (since I had four actions to test, why not change up the flavor!) and so far my favorite has been CherryBalmz Bolt-Balm . It’s thick, slick, and comes in the smallest container I’ve ever gotten. However, I use just the thinnest amount of the stuff and it lasts for…well, almost forever. So I fully expect this tiny jar to last me years – at least. CherryBalmz Bolt Balm I know I said those people who said that “all bolt actions are the same” were wrong, but they aren’t completely wrong. For the most part – a bolt rifle is a bolt rifle. But like the Willy Wonka Factory, it’s the little things that matter most. Outside of a smooth action and great accuracy, bolt-actions need the little things going for them to really put them over the top of their competition. Howa 1500s have two major “little things” that stand out to the user. H.A.C.T. Trigger By far what sets them apart from the pack is the Howa Actuator Controlled Trigger. Basically, it’s the best out-of-the-box trigger I’ve ever used. I would compare it to and place it on par with two-stage triggers from Gessisle and Timminy. All four of my actions had identical pull weights and they matched what Howa claims them to be: 3-pound pull weight triggers. I happen to love 2-stage triggers in basically all of my rifles, hunting and tactical, so that was perfect for me. The only downside to these triggers is there isn’t really much of a way to adjust them if you wanted to do so. Being a tinkering type, I poked around online to see if I could mess with the weights of the triggers – not that I needed to do so, I just… wanted to. To my mild disappointment, all I found was videos on how to trim the springs of the HACT to reduce the pull weight or take up of the trigger. I’m not a fan of screwing with springs like that since bad things can happen, so I decided to not try it. I hope that someday Howa offers a spring pack that would allow me to fine tune the trigger, but at this time there isn’t such a thing on the market. That said – it is still the best factory trigger in my collection. And if you’re planning on doing your rifle on a budget, it’s really nice getting a very high-end trigger feel without the added aftermarket cost. Coffee Safety First This is another one of those little things, a 3-position safety! No, it doesn’t come with a full-auto setting. BUT! It does come with three safety options – fire, trigger disconnect, and bolt locked/trigger disconnect. Howa 1500 in Boyds’ Fire is…fire. It Lets you fire the rifle. Kind of handy but also generally standard. The second setting is a trigger disconnect, this makes it so that even if the trigger is pulled – the rifle won’t fire. But while in this setting it still lets you work the bolt allowing you to load, unload, chamber, or extract a cartridge while keeping the rifle safe from accidental fire. This might not be too awesome for competition, but for hunting, it can be very handy – being able to safely open the bolt, stuff an extra round in, and close the bolt all while keeping the rifle safe from fireing is a nice feature. The third setting is a complete safety that locks the bolt handle in place while disconnecting the trigger. Accuracy and Shooting Keep in mind that to get the most out of your barreled action, you need to use the right parts. You get what you put in. That said, as long as you do your part and set your Howa 1500 up with the right stock/chassis and feed it good ammo, it is astonishingly accurate! MDT Chassis The best set-up I found was the Howa 1500 BA in 6.5CM – heavy barrel , mounted in the MDT ESS chassis and using Hornady 6.5CM 140gr ELD-Match ammo Best Barreled Action Howa "1500 Barreled Action" , 6.5 Creedmoor 460 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 460 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing With this, and my Vortex Diamondback Tactical 4-16x (review coming soon, awesome scope!) I shot this group: Group near bullseye is a 5-shot group, Howa 1500 in 6.5CM on the MDT ESS Chassis The group near the bullseye is a 5-shot group at 150 yards, slightly under 1/5th MOA (bullseye is 1/4″). I shot this off a bag and rear bag set-up on top of a plywood bench, no concrete, lead sled or vice clamps. Oh, and I didn’t even let the barrel cool between shots – that was a rapid-ish string, 5 shots across about 30 seconds. And if you’re wondering what that flyer is at the top of the target – that was from the gentleman next to me trying to ring steel with his Mosin-Nagant using Tulammo…he was only off his target by 4 feet… I tested 6 different ammo types and brands through that exact rifle, almost all of them were between 1/2 and 1 MOA – the only one that wasn’t was the cheap stuff I shot while breaking in the rifle. Don’t let the ESS fool you, the LSS-XL also made for an outstanding shooter! A 5-shot group with Howa 1500 in .308 in an MDT LSS-XL chassis – just under 1/2 MOA (flyer to the far left was the shooters fault) The flyer to the left was my fault so I threw it out of the grouping and fired a 6th round to give me a nice 5-shot group, without the flyer this is under 1/2 MOA using Federal Gold Medal Match Sierra Match King 168gr ammo. Both the ESS and LSS-XL can deliver amazing stuff – if you do your part! Boyds’ Gun Stocks While the MDT chassis are designed and built for ultra-precision, Boyds’ stocks are for more common shooting. While groups clearly opened up once I switched, they still remained very respectable. A testament to not only Boyds’ great work, but also to the Howa 1500 itself. Howa 1500 in Boyds AT-One, 300 Win Mag. 5-shot group 3/4 MOA Boyds’ AT-One is a great stock to work with, a nice cross between a precision stock and a classic wood. And it produces great results. Above is a 5-shot group using the AT-One stock shooting 300 Win Mag, slightly over 3/4 MOA. Before you start chewing me out in the comments…yes, I know that I shot horrible there. In my defense, I saved the 300 Win Mag till last so I had already shot about 40 rounds of 6.5 Creedmoor, 60 rounds of .308 (took a while to sight in, my fault), 30 rounds of .30-06, and 15 rounds of 300 Win Mag all in one range session…my shoulder was getting really sore! However, that really should tell you how great of a BA and stock this set up is. 300 Win Mag is a beast of a cartridge and even after a long day of shooting, I still put out a 5-shot rapid string under 1 MOA with using only bags for support. The AT-One makes it very easy to get in a great shooting position and the Howa 1500 puts rounds where you send them, period. By the Numbers Reliability 5/5 Bolt guns are often the most reliable out there, but there are some that just don’t work. I never had a problem with the Howas, both with using magazines from MDT in the chassis or using the Howa internal-magazines with the Boyds’ stocks – I never had a single misfeed, stick, or failure to extract. Accuracy 5/5 Do your part and a Howa 1500 BA will shoot like a dream. While the best I achieved was 1/5th MOA, I would expect a better shooter and hand loaded ammo to trim that number down even further. If you’re building your Howa as more of a hunting oriented set-up, I would absolutely expect at least 1 MOA with decent factory ammo. The .30-06, .300 Win Mag, and .308 rifles all shot that or better using mass-produced mid-tier ammo. Ergonomics 4/5 While it depends on the stock/chassis that you put the Howa BA into, I’ve found two things about the BA itself that I don’t love – first is the bolt handle’s knob is really small. Granted, I have big hands – but the knob is on the small side regardless. Second, the safety takes more force to actuate than I would like. While this ensures it won’t be engaged or disengaged by accident, having it be slightly easier would have been nice. Both of these are fairly minor issues though and in no way really impacted my shooting. Looks 5/5 Howa offers their BAs in a few different Cerakotings and in a standard bluing. The blueing is very well done, dark color, and even. Their Cerakote is equally well done. My BAs came in an Australian Brown (a dark FDE) and standard bluing. Both looked outstanding! Customization 5/5 It’s a barreled action, it’s designed to be customized! I found almost every major manufacturer of stocks and chassis offered an option for the Howa 1500, while I went with MDT and Boyds’, I also saw McMillan, Bell & Carlson, H-S Precision, GRS, and Manners carried options too. Bang for the Buck/Value 5/5 I’m impressed . For the price this runs you, you’re getting a lot for your money. To me, this is by far the best way to enter into the semi-custom bolt-action rifle world. While you could spend upwards of $5,000 on the perfect custom rifle, you can easily build a 1,000-yard rifle with the Howa 1500 BA for under $1,000 – including glass. If you wanted to bump up your budget a bit, the MDT chassis is a perfect mate for the Howa 1500 action and would set you up perfectly for PRS and F-Class competitions . Overall Rating 4.5/5 These are great BAs and for the price, very high value. While there are some minor things I would change, they also offer several nice features that aren’t found in other rifles of the same price point. Parting Shots With four BAs, 2 stocks, 2 chassis, and 5 different optics tested – I’ve had some real time and options to get to know the Howa 1500 barreled action. The best thing I can say about it is the value Howa delivers. Yes, there are better actions and barrels in the world of custom precision shooting and high-end hunting – but not at this price range. Even at double this price range, you’re not going to find a lot of options that keep up with Howa. If you want an out-of-the-box rifle to take hunting, a BA probably isn’t what you’re looking for. But if you a semi-custom rifle to fit you and your needs, or if you just like to tinker a little, then the Howa 1500 Barreled Action is perfect! All you need to do is decide what caliber and finish you want and the rest falls into place. I would highly recommend their 6.5 Creedmoor option, it was by far the best I used and a blast to work with. "Best Barreled Action" Howa 1500 Barreled Action, 6.5 Creedmoor 460 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 460 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing If you want to learn more about the 6.5 CM then you’ll want to read our Ultimate Guide to the 6.5 Creedmoor ! Do you have a Howa 1500? Planning on taking yours out hunting or to a local long-range event? Let us know in the comments! And check out the rest of our favorite gun and gear in Editor’s Picks .

Self-Defense: Developing A Combat Mindset

Self-Defense: Developing A Combat Mindset

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d13dbeb3_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d13dbeb3_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Self-defense is a fight for your life. The only way to ensure you come out on top is preparation. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Have you ever heard of having a combat mindset? Let me give you the best advice I can to help you save your life. Read, consume and absorb Principles of Personal Defense . Jeff Cooper, the founder of Gunsite, wrote this book and it costs less than 20 rounds of good defensive handgun ammunition . For those who will not take my advice or whose wallets are as tight as a barrel bushing on a 1911 — with apologies to Col. Cooper — I’ll summarize. Related GunDigest Articles 7 Hot New Handguns For Everyday Carry The .22 LR For Self Defense: Good, Bad Or Crazy? Concealed Carry: Concealing A Single-Action Revolver Alertness: Be aware, be ready; bad things can happen at any time. Live by the Gunsite (Cooper) Color Code. Decisiveness: Counterattack now! Do not tarry . To ponder is to perish. Aggressiveness: Go at it like you mean it. Speed: Be sudden, be quick. Be first. Coolness: Keep your wits. Don’t lose control of your emotions. Ruthlessness: Strike with all your strength for every blow. Shoot them to the ground. Surprise: Do not wilt, do not cower, and don’t be predictable. Fight back. This, in brief, is the mindset you must have for self-defense. An acquaintance believes in luck, and if it did exist it would be a wonderful thing to believe in. But luck seems to have a way of showing up at random. And, randomness, while it might be acceptable in sports, love and hunting, is not acceptable in a self-defense situation — when your life is on the line. As it’s been said, luck is when opportunity meets preparation. Prepare your mind — get the combat mindset — and when opportunity or bad timing puts your life on the line , you’ll be lucky.

Book Review: Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon

Book Review: Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon

About the Author (From the front matter in Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon ):  Lynda King is a freelance writer and former newspaper editor who lives with her husband in a 19th-century farmhouse on a one-acre “mini-farm” in Central Massachusetts, where they maintain a large organic garden and a small flock of chickens.  As a Girl Scout, Lynda learned “Always be prepared!” … and took that early lesson to heart.  Today her grandchildren frequently quote her oft-repeated adage: “I’d rather have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.” Quick Navigation The Book Likes Dislikes Conclusion The Book Lynda is president and co-founder of a group in her town dedicated to creating a self-reliant community.  The group has worked closely with the town’s emergency management personnel on organizing a CERT team and has hosted educational programs on emergency preparedness. The group also organizes sustainable living workshops that have included skills such as bread- and cheese-making, home canning, beekeeping, and understanding alternative energy. Born and raised in New England, and a proud Yankee through and through, Lynda values self-reliance, and has as one of her favorite quotes a line from the children’s story “ The Little Red Hen ”: “Then I’ll do it myself,” said the Little Red Hen. And she did. Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon is a unique book that, as the author describes, explores how historical events have helped shape a “growing collective psyche” focused on preparedness as part of a lifestyle that is critical to human survival.  This is not a “how to” book; it’s more of a “why to” book that offers insights to people outside of the prepping community on who and what preppers are.  The book steps the reader through events from our past that loom large as concerns for today’s preppers—from economic collapse to solar flares, massive storms, wars, terrorist attacks, civil unrest, looting, pandemics, oil shortages, and government duplicity—it’s all been here before.  The book also explains that although “fringe extremists” have been around for decades, they don’t define the prepping movement. Likes This well-written book offers many “reminders” which show that, as bad as things may seem in many areas today—from government to the economy, to climate, to international affairs—they have been this bad, and sometimes worse, before.  The thing that has brought increased attention to today’s events is the technology that has brought us the Internet, an assortment of “smart” devices that can instantly message us about what’s going on, and a 24×7 news cycle that keeps crises in front of us nonstop. Also Read: Book Review – Holding Their Own I liked the way the book ( Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon ) is organized—in two parts, the first covering historical events, and the second looking at modern day preppers.  The first part is organized by decades, offering a chronology of important events from before 1950 through the early years of the 21st century.  There is a lot of information here, all well-sourced.  It may be too much for some people, but it is organized in such a way that the reader can pick and choose which chapters to read; you don’t necessarily have to read it cover-to-cover, sequentially.  It is a good reference book. I also liked the list of resources, and think they could be particularly helpful to someone new to prepping.  The book points to helpful websites and expositions, and even offers a list of “jargon” common among preppers. Dislikes The book may disappoint some, in that it doesn’t focus on the life and times of early preppers who are held by some as heroes in the prepper/survivalist movement , such as Kurt Saxon , Howard Ruff , Robert D. Kephart , Jim Rawles , or Mel Tappan .  It does discuss some of their contributions as well as those of the Nearings and Ragnar Benson , but it isn’t a history about them. Conclusion I think Preppers: History and the Cultural Phenomenon would be a great book for new preppers who may be unsure of themselves when it comes to prepping, and may be surrounded by people who think they are crazy.  It would make a good gift from preppers to those in their personal networks who are not yet on board with the preparedness movement, and it would be useful for those in law enforcement and the media who are not quite sure what preppers or survivalist are, or who are convinced they are all “fringe extremists.” Photos By: Internet Prepper Press Other interesting articles: LDS Preparedness Manual: Book Review for 2020 Book Review: Air Rifles: A Buyer’s and Shooter’s Guide Book Review: Adrift, Seventy Six Days Lost at Sea Book Review: Lights Out

5 Easy Steps On How To Clean A Gun (2020)

Mechanical devices demand regular and proper maintenance.  This certainly includes all firearms which do require a good cleaning and lubrication after use to keep their operational performance at a peak for a survival scenario. Generally, though, regular maintenance does not imply that a firearm needs to be disassembled to the last screw and spring in order to clean it.  Any firearm can get a basic fundamental cleaning in five quick steps. Quick Navigation How To Clean a Gun: All You Need to Know 1. Unload and Remove Bolt 2. Swab Bore 3. Scrub Bore 4. Run Bore with Patches 5. Apply Light Lubrication How To Clean a Gun: All You Need to Know 1. Unload and Remove Bolt Before cleaning any gun, open the action to make sure it is unloaded, and then read the owner’s manual for specific gun model instructions.  Remove clips or magazines.  Take out the bolt in a rifle, or lock open the action of a semi-auto rifle, shotgun, or pistol.  Brush with solvent, clean, dry off, and lightly lube the bolt.  Make sure you brush the extractor and/or ejector as well. 2. Swab Bore Set the cleaned bolt aside and working from the breech or chamber end only run a cleaning rod with attached bronze brush soaked in gun solvent down the barrel and out the muzzle.  Repeat this same action if the barrel is particularly dirty.  Let it sit for 10-15 minutes.  This allows the solvent to dissolve and soften bullet jacket material, lead, and powder fowling. Hoppe's Elite Gun Cleaner Spray Bottle, 8 Ounces Hoppes Elite gun Cleaner meets the demands of professional shooters, military and law enforcement by... Penetrates down to the steel's molecular pores, removing carbon, lead, and most copper fouling See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:48 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA 3. Scrub Bore After the solvent soak, run the solvent soaked bronze brush down the barrel again several times to loosen the gunk in the barrel.  Purists would say to unscrew the brush at the muzzle at each stroke of the cleaning rod rather than pulling it back up and out the chamber.  If you are a professional target shooter, this extra effort might make a difference, however for the average everyday deer rifle or .22 LR, this is not necessary.  You make that judgment for your gun especially if the application is law enforcement or security or the like. After ten or so runs of the brush, I do recommend next running a cloth patch down the bore to push any excess carbon out the muzzle. In this case do not pull the patch back out.  Take it off the rod, put on a clean one, and then pull the rod back out the chamber end.  Repeat again with the brush scrubbing.  As a rule of thumb on most hunting guns running the brush 25 times should do the job. 4. Run Bore with Patches Next run several solvent soaked patches down the barrel and out the muzzle end.  Replace each time with a clean patch, pull back up, and replace patch again. Do this until you are satisfied with the relative cleanliness of the patch. They may never come out completely white, but if they come out black, with shades of blue and green, then keep cleaning. Solvent can turn a lot of barrel fowling bluish or green. If this continues, you may need to soak the barrel again, rest it, and then brush again. It all depends on how many rounds were shot since the last cleaning.  If you deer hunted and shot the gun a half dozen times in a season that is of course much different than running 500 rounds through a .22 rimfire rifle, or a .223 AR rifle on the shooting range or a 9mm handgun doing police qualification shooting. Another great tool for cleaning the bore of your rifle or pistol is Hoppe's Bore Snake .  Here is a quick video product review of the Bore Snake.  I own a few of these (Joel) and had success using them. 5. "Apply Light Lubrication" Contrary to popular belief guns do not perform well swimming in oil. After all the swabbing and scrubbing, the barrel just needs a light coat of rust prevention oil as does the bolt. Use a clean soft cotton cloth with oil to wipe down all the metal surfaces of the gun.  A very little on the wood stock does not hurt it.  Don’t overdo oil. I do this final step wearing those $1 brown cotton gloves to keep fingerprints from ending up on the metal before storage. As to storage, do not put any firearm in any kind of a sealed case, either fabric or plastic for long term.  If you do, add a packet of moisture desiccant in the case, otherwise, just prop the gun up safely locked in a closet or secure area.  Ammo should be kept in a place separate from guns. Are there other steps that could be added?  Sure.  Use a clean toothbrush to dust in the juncture of the barrel where fitted to the stock.  Brush off sights, mounts, scope metal, too.  Clean optical lenses like any high quality glass.   Brush around the trigger area.  Clean the clip or magazine and oil lightly.  Brush up into the magazine insert cavity below the action.  Brush off the butt plate that usually ends up in the dirt. There you have completed a basic gun cleaning to prepare for a survival situation.  Be sure to check the gun ever so often to make sure no rusting has slipped up on the metal surfaces.  It is also a good idea before shooting your gun again to run a dry patch down the barrel to clean out any left over oil or dust.   If you continue to maintain your guns after each use, they will be ready when you need them. Best Gun Cleaning Kits You also buy ready-to-go cleaning kits to make this process easier. Here are our most recommended kits: Preview Product Rating GLORYFIRE Universal Gun Cleaning Kit Hunting Rifle Handgun Shot Gun... No ratings yet See Price on Amazon Otis Technologies FG-750 Cleaning System, Tactical, Clam Package No ratings yet See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 04:28 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Photos by: Dr. Woods, Chris Vesely , US Navy Other interesting articles: How To Clean and Eat Skunk Glock – Ultimate Survival Pistol in 2020 PDW – Do You Really Need One? 2020 Debate KEL-TEC KSG: Survival Gun Review for 2020

Classic Firearms: Winchester Model 70

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f3783818bf23_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f3783818bf23_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Throughout its various production periods, the top-of-the-line Model 70 has been the Super Grade. The rifleman's rifle, the Winchester Model 70 still stirs shooters souls. What Made the Pre-'64 Model 70 So Desirable: Oversized Mauser claw extractor Excellent hand checkering Bolt handled allowed for a lower scope position Recoil lug and bedding system created a stiffer action Just plain accurate For many years, Winchester’s Model 70 was the standard by which all other centerfire bolt-action rifles were compared. Introduced in 1936, it was a time when bolt-actions were well on the way to replacing the great lever guns of the prior century. Our doughboys who served in World War I with 1903 Springfields came home with an appreciation of the inherent accuracy and rugged reliability of bolt-actions. During the Great War, the major American gun companies were already making plans to develop new firearms for the civilian market. Not long after the war was over, Remington, along with Winchester and Eddystone Arsenal, had supplied troops with the Model 1917 Springfield and developed a civilian version in .30-06 known as the Remington Model 30. Savage unveiled its first bolt-action—the Model 1920 Hi-Power in .250 Savage and .300 Savage. Winchester engineers had been working on a bolt gun for several years and, in 1925, the company introduced the Model 54, chambered for the .30-06 and a new cartridge known as the .270 Winchester. Winchester’s Model 54 The Model 54 combined some features of the M1903 Springfield, the M1917 and the M98 Mauser. It was offered in 10 different model variants and 10 chamberings and was generally well-received in the marketplace. Learn More About Legendary Winchester 9 Greatest Winchester Rifles And Shotguns Ever Made Restored To Life: Winchester 1886 Winchester Model 94 : Receivers Winchester Model 1897 Riot Gun Classic Firearms: Winchester Model 62 But timing is everything, and the 1929 market crash and subsequent Great Depression kept sales low, not just for the Model 54, but for other Winchester models as well. This ad appeared in several outdoor magazines in 1950. (Photo: Winchester Repeating Arms) After 65 years of numerous management changes and being controlled most of that time by one family, "Winchester Repeating Arms" was forced into receivership. On December 22, 1931, Western Cartridge Company purchased the gunmaker. The Model 54 had seen several improvements since 1925, but under the new management, the engineers made plans for a totally new rifle. 1 The Model 70 The Model 70 was announced on January 1, 1937. It had some of the same features as the Model 54 but with numerous improvements. These included a hinged floorplate, straighter stock with superior checkering, a forged-steel trigger guard and an adjustable trigger based on the override trigger of the Model 52 .22 rimfire target rifle, which was well-known for its crisp letoff. Changes were made to the bolt handle and the safety lever to allow a lower scope position, as well as to the recoil lug and bedding system to obtain a stiffer action and improved accuracy. 2 Related GunDigest Articles Classic Firearms: Winchester Model 62 Video: Turnbull's Stunning Winchester 1892 Deluxe Takedown 9 Greatest Winchester Rifles "And Shotguns Ever" Made The Model 70 quickly gained a solid reputation for its design, accuracy and workmanship. At the time, Jack O’Connor was on his way to becoming “the dean of American gun writers,” and he referred to the new Winchester as one of the two best rifles in the world (the other being the M98 Mauser). 3 Most collector interest in Winchesters is for models made before 1964—the year the company made significant changes to its manufacturing methods and gun designs. These changes gave Winchester a better position in the marketplace to compete with gunmakers that were using more-modern ways to make their products. Among the changes made to the Model 70 were a redesigned action with a push-feed bolt instead of controlled-round feed, a free-floating barrel and a new style stock with impressed checkering. In the barrels, instead of broached rifling and cut chambers, both were cold-forged or swaged. There were many other internal changes, including a move to precision casting for many parts instead of machined bar stock, redesigned ejectors and extractors, and a wider trigger. 4

Summary

I have had the Trijicon 7MOA dot in my possession for about a week. I chose the dual illuminated version for set it and forget it use. I have not had range time with the optic yet but have had plenty of time to examine and play with it.